Vendor Profile: Karberry Farm

Karberry Farm is in Mountain, Ontario, that’s south and slightly east of Ottawa. Although we’d far rather visit them in person at Sunshine Fibre Fest, for now you’ll just have to check out their fabulous products online.

In addition to lovely, luxurious Shetland and hand-dyed wool, they have a great variety of goods for sale online. Great gift ideas for your favourite fibre friends!

www. karberryfarm.ca  Shetland sheep, fleece, wool and more!

Karberry Farms offer shipping and curbside pick up and by appointment at a later date.

Vendor Profile: Exquisite E Yarns and Rovings

Exquisite E Yarns and Rovings is owned by Sue Needle. Sue has been an Angora breeder for over 41 years and a fiber artist for 37 years. She has been a top Angora producer for over 40 years along with being a National Wool/Skein/Garment multi time winner.  Wins have included National Best in Show winner in all categories including Best in Show Raw Angora, Best in Show Skein and Best in Show Garment. Currently her studio is concentrating on Yarns for the discerning knitter as well as luxurious art batts. Primary focus is Angora Rabbit wool from Bunny to Bonnet. Angora is the softest and warmest fiber you’ll ever feel!

To purchase angora yarns, rovings and art batts, here’s how you can reach Sue:

e-mail: sueneedle20@gmail.com

text:  705 321-3209

https://www.facebook.com/angoraproducts4you/

https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/ExquisiteEYarns

Introducing Lady Beatrix from Heartland Creations

Lady Beatrix

by Sheila Klugescheid

All in the Family

What do the Sunshine Fibre Fest Co-Organizer, Heartland Creations, and Megs Fancy Bunnies have in common? That would be a cute brown bunny named Lady Beatrix.

After many months of working during this pandemic and very little going on at Heartland Creations, I thought I needed a little extra excitement in my life and would add one more family member to our hobby farm. Anyone who knows me knows I have a passion for sheep (we have 7) and rabbits. For a long while I had 2 house bunnies, the first was an English Angora named Starbuck who lived a good long life and the second is an American Fuzzy Lop by the name of Princess Chelsea Bun.

Actually this story started 5 years ago when Mary of Megs Fancy Bunnies and I each bought a Fuzzy Lop from the same litter at a rabbit show at the Orillia Fair where we first met. Every once in a while, Mary will send me pics or I will see posts on our Sunshine Fibre Fest page (check out @ Megs Fancy Bunnies).  I have a hard time resisting her cute baby bunnies, but this email was a little different.  Beatrix was re-homed back to Mary after her owner lost their job due to COVID-19 shut down or so the story goes. Beatrix’s mom is Mary’s Forget me Knot and her dad is Mary’s buck Mickey Blue Eyes (Chelsea’s brother) so as the saying goes, double the trouble and double the fun, this approximately 8th month old blue eyed Fuzzy Lop bundle of energy now lives at our house. Beatrix loves to be petted just like her aunt Chelsea and also loves to leap from the top of her cage and land on her pillow. Her most valuable item seems to be her litter box which she sits in when anything gets too close to her cage. She is very slowly warming up to her aunt Chelsea but they still aren’t sure about one another yet and I still only let one out at a time. Beatrix did lie down and have a nap in front of Chelsea’s cage today without any thumping or nipping so maybe there is hope of them becoming friends. It’s time for me to feed the girls and tuck them in, hope you enjoy hearing a little of what I’ve been up to.

Marie and I are looking forward to hearing stories from our other Sunshine Fibre Fest Vendors about what is keeping you busy during this lock down.

Warm and Wooly Wishes from Sheila Klugescheid

Chelsea, Beatrix’s aunt

What are you doing to survive COVID-19?

It’s a Little Thing, It’s a Big Thing

What are you doing to survive the COVID-19 pandemic?  I find I am unable to focus on my small craft business, and instead I’m sewing masks.  And giving them away.  Lots of them.

I started in May of 2019, with a simple pattern I downloaded from the internet (How To Sew A Fabric Face Mask, ©SarahMaker.com, with thanks!) and that was the start.  I made up a couple of masks with scraps of quilting cottons I found quickly and loved the result.  I dug deeper and found a stash of quilting cottons from my small craft business and cut out my first batch of 50.

And then I just started giving them away, to friends and family. I made 50 at a time, always in a variety of fabrics, and continued to give them away.  My partner’s workplace is an essential service, so I dropped off a batch there, for staff and customers.  And I gave masks to volunteers and clients at the nearby Foodbanks.  To grocery clerks and customers in line when I went shopping.  I found I couldn’t take money for them – the joy was in the giving and the smiles on the faces when people got to choose from among the beautiful quilting cottons in each batch.  As my son’s girlfriend, Grace says, “it’s a little piece of art”.  I think, because of Grace’s enthusiasm and the mistake I made in bringing her along when shopping for fabric one time, she probably has the greatest mask collection of anyone I have given them to!

And after the first shut down was over, I carried them everywhere.  I took a batch along to my dentist – although the staff all have to wear the medical-grade masks at work, outside of work they could wear cloth masks.  The delight that greeted me when I took in a new batch of masks on a return visit to the dentist was the perfect antidote to the completely frustrating task of running errands for my Mum (grocery store, pet store, drug store) that day in the cold and the snow.  In and out of the car:  mask on, gloves on, lock car, head to store, sanitize hands, shop, return to car, unlock car, mask off, gloves off, sanitize hands…you know the routine!  The smiles on the faces of the dentist and the hygienists and the receptionist as they selected masks for themselves and their family – that image sustains me.  And if people want to contribute, I ask them to pay it forward, to donate to their favourite charity or help someone else in some way.

The fabrics are colourful and fun, and when I discovered fabrics with marijuana leaves on them, I bought some of that too.  There’s a whole little subset of the population, many of them younger (but not all!) that get particular delight from that fabric, and I feel I am doing my bit to inspire mask wearing among all ages.

I think we’re all just doing what we can and doing the best we can.  I have to remind myself of that.  Making a mask, wearing a mask, is such a little thing.  But it is also a big thing.

Sunshine Fibre Fest postponed until Saturday July 25, 2020

Hello Everyone
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic dragging on into April and now that it has been announced schools and events are to be cancelled until at least May 4th ,we feel that we cannot provide a safe environment for all of our vendors, volunteers, demonstrators and the general public at this time. Therefore Sunshine Fibre Fest along with ODAS Park have made the decision to reschedule until Sat July 25th, 2020.
We have devoted many, many hours to this show and are committed to providing a venue for local artisans, farmers and other vendors involved in all things fibre, as well as to provide a wonderful local event for people in the near north interested in exploring and pursuing fibre crafts.

Sheila and I look forward to seeing you at the show. Thank you to everyone for your ongoing support, patience and understanding.

Marie Sternberg and Sheila Klugescheid
Sunshine Fibre Fest